The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, scientist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Apr 16

nevver:

Plastic bag landscapes, Vilde J. Rolfsen

(via electrical-potential)


Apr 15

likeafieldmouse:

Christo & Jeanne-Claude - Wrapped Coast (completed installation, construction & preparatory studies, 1968-9)


ourrisd:

In the middle of a dusty race track, Thor Oren 14 SC feverishly struggles to release the front wheel of his human-powered rover from the clutches of an unforgiving sandpit. But cranking on the pedals, he only sinks further into the trench. Eventually the lanky sculptor hops off his seat, yanks the vehicle onto solid ground and speeds away from the troublesome terrain as fast as he can. 

Oren and his peers were competing in the NASA Human Exploration Rover Challenge (formerly known as the NASA Great Moonbuggy Race), a competition last Friday at the US Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. More than 90 colleges from around the world entered their designs for a lightweight, two-person rover intended to race along a half-mile track meant to simulate Martian terrain – with plenty of rocks, craters and shifting sand. The challenge addresses the real mechanical problems NASA engineers face when preparing for actual exploration missions.

In preparation for the competition, the RISD team practically camped out in the ID Metal Shop over spring break, working nonstop with acetylene torches and soldering irons. They hammered out a series of iterations before constructing a steel-framed rover that weighs in at 45 kilograms (see top photo). “It’s incredibly light compared to other teams’ [vehicles],” notes Senior Critic Michael Lye 96 ID, who advised students on their entry. “We were really pleased with the efficiency of the design.”

In addition to keeping up a breakneck pace to prepare the vehicle for the competition, the venture was full of excitement. In one of the final laps of the race, the rover smashed into a large obstacle, which ended up damaging a wheel chain, along with its overall race times. But RISD students were thrilled to win the Crash and Burn Award, an accolade reserved for the team that recovers from the worst breakdown. 

“Students learned how to fix problems when they arise in a complicated mechanical system,” explains Lye. “That’s an invaluable experience.” 

Click here to watch a video of the Rover Challenge awards ceremony.

 


“I can sympathize with Ken Kesey who once said that he stopped writing because he was tired of being a seismograph—an instrument that measures rumblings from a great distance. He said he wanted to be a lightning rod.” Tom Wolfe (via theparisreview)

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

explore-blog:

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

(via npr)


Apr 14
showslow:

Embroidered mattress by Louise Riley

showslow:

Embroidered mattress by Louise Riley

(via stunninglyy)


The sketchbooks of Alison Worman

(via paradoxicalsentiments)


Apr 10
“Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery. […] Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.” Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery. (via alliterate)

(via oliviawaite)


Apr 9
newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd
Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).

newyorker:

Last week, the New York Public Library released twenty thousand maps from its extensive collection. Take a look at five that unearth New York City’s past: http://nyr.kr/1oKjBDd

Above: Pocket edition of “The Merchant’s and Shipper’s Guide Map to the Port of New York,” by S. D. L. Taunton (1879).


explore-blog:

Rudy’s Library in Monowi, Nebraska – one of the many soul-warming photographs in Robert Dawson’s visual love letter to public libraries:

The entire population of this town consists of one woman, Elsie Eller. It is the only incorporated municipality in the United States with such a demographic. She acts as mayor and runs the only business in town, a local roadhouse. Over the years she watched all the other town residents move or pass away. When her husband, Rudy Eller, died in 2004, she became the town’s last resident. Because Rudy had collected so many books, she decided to open Rudy’s lLIbrary in a small shed next to her home. This memorial to Rudy is free and open to all. Patrons can check out books by signing a notebook. A wooden sign in the corner simply states “Rudy’s Dream.”

More such treats here.

explore-blog:

Rudy’s Library in Monowi, Nebraska – one of the many soul-warming photographs in Robert Dawson’s visual love letter to public libraries:

The entire population of this town consists of one woman, Elsie Eller. It is the only incorporated municipality in the United States with such a demographic. She acts as mayor and runs the only business in town, a local roadhouse. Over the years she watched all the other town residents move or pass away. When her husband, Rudy Eller, died in 2004, she became the town’s last resident. Because Rudy had collected so many books, she decided to open Rudy’s lLIbrary in a small shed next to her home. This memorial to Rudy is free and open to all. Patrons can check out books by signing a notebook. A wooden sign in the corner simply states “Rudy’s Dream.”

More such treats here.

(via npr)


rudygodinez:

Charles Rohault de Fleury, Jardin des Plantes Glasshouses, (1833-1834)

Unfortunately, the Jardin des Plantes does not exist today in it’s original form, but the complex still reflects Rohault’s basic concept. The steps, terraces and ramp which rises between the two central pavilions still stand as he designed them, as do the masonry structures built against the slope of the north side which contain the heating system, gardner’s living quarters, etc..

The eastern wing, which would have made the building symmetrical, was planned but never executed by the architect. A winter garden was erected in it’s place in 1882, and was demolished in 1932 to make room for a new building. The western wing, with it’s two long, curved roofs set one above the other, consisted originally of two quarter-vaults. The central pavilions still have the proportions of Rohault’s design, but instead of the straight surfaces of the old hipped roof, the present day roof is curved and supported by several steel trusses.


bellusverus:

Lebbeus Woods at the San Francisco MoMA (RIP)

bellusverus:

Lebbeus Woods at the San Francisco MoMA (RIP)


juvenide-inspiration:

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The Dative by Byron Kinnaird


architectural-review:

New Lohachara: A dialogue between man and the [super]natural
by Kirsty Badenoch
  Aarhus School of Architecture DK-8000 Aarhus C Denmark

architectural-review:

New Lohachara: A dialogue between man and the [super]natural

by Kirsty Badenoch

Aarhus School of Architecture DK-8000 Aarhus C Denmark


Apr 7

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