The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Sep 1
darkeranddown:

Study of an Interior/ Exterior with Dumbo
Benjamin Cohen

darkeranddown:

Study of an Interior/ Exterior with Dumbo

Benjamin Cohen


Robert Montgomery

Robert Montgomery



Let This Be a Record

In the past few days I have felt stronger and more whole than I have in months. I am ready to make meaningful work. I am ready to foster friendships and love. I am ready to immerse myself deeply in all that I do—but this time without the suffering, the anguish, and the uncertainty that for so long was an element of my process. There is so much joy throughout my body. There is so much sky behind my eyes. 


nevver:

Train in vain, Pierre Folk

(via art-sci)


pantslesswrock:

sixpenceee:

MOSES BRIDGE, NETHERLANDS

It was originally built in the early 1700’s to protect the Netherlands from invasions. It is constructed out of Accoya wood, a waterproof wood. The designers assured that flooding will not be a problem because the height of the water is controlled an adjustable dam. The dam also includes a pump in case the water overflows. 

SOURCE

THATS SO COOL

AND 18TH CENTURY NO LESS

(via junjou-lime)


archatlas:

The BIG Maze - National Building Museum rcruzniemiec aka archatlas

The last day but I made it!

The Museum, in partnership with BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group, will create a never-before-seen large-scale maze for the Museum’s historic home. Soaring approximately 18 feet high and measuring 60 feet by 60 feet, the maple plywood structure will boast a series of twists and turns for visitors to weave through and explore." [via]


bollykecks:

my year in moleskines, an autobiography

(via art-sci)


hoodbypussy:

Évolution inversée

“It took me four years to paint like Raphael, but a lifetime to paint like a child.”
― Pablo Picasso

(via art-sci)




 Postcards From Google Earth
“The images are screenshots from Google Earth. They are glitches that occur when the 2d satellite imagery and 3d terrain don’t line up quite right, or structures such as bridges get projected down onto the terrain below, creating fabulous and unintentional distortions”- Clement Valla

 Postcards From Google Earth

“The images are screenshots from Google Earth. They are glitches that occur when the 2d satellite imagery and 3d terrain don’t line up quite right, or structures such as bridges get projected down onto the terrain below, creating fabulous and unintentional distortions”- Clement Valla

(via priscillama)



likeafieldmouse:

Milena Bonilla - Noises (2007)

likeafieldmouse:

Milena Bonilla - Noises (2007)


uimapcoll:

August 29, 1842: The Treaty of Nanking was signed, marking the end of the First Opium War between the UK and China.

I really appreciate the precision of the publisher’s location on the front cover of the map: “(Four Doors from Trafalgar Square) Next door to the post office”

Map: Wyld, James. A map to illustrate the war in China; compiled from surveys & sketches by British officers and other information. London: J. Wyld, 1857

(via fuckyeahcartography)


paradoxicalsentiments:

brief thoughts on norwegian wood:

  • my expectations were LOW so I actually enjoyed it quite a bit
  • the cinematography is stunning, one of the most gorgeous contemporary films I’ve seen recently (I took a million screenshots and here are a few)
  • the score (johnny greenwood !!!) is also incredible, these are the two standout features of the movie
  • casting choices did not bother me at all, actors gave believable performances I felt were true to the novel’s characters
  • the director did overgeneralize the tone of the book, but at least nailed notes of it in a way that both impressed me and enabled me to look past the rest of the film’s faults
  • the story itself definitely doesn’t do justice to the plot of the book, which is understandable given murakami’s style and structure
  • several minor characters are either ignored or skimmed over, disappointing but also understandable given the time allotment

in conclusion I think it was worth watching, more so as a standalone film rather than an adaptation. I also think it made a huge difference that I read the book a year ago so I couldn’t be as critical. visually and musically, it’s worth checking out imo (unless you’re one to get frustrated that it doesn’t adhere to every aspect of the novel)


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