The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Aug 27

printclubboston:

Portraits of a print shop. Some pictures we took on a cloudy morning around the letterpress studio at the The Cracker Factory in Geneva, NY. 


“"What came first — the music or the misery?" That sad-sack line from High Fidelity more or less sums up most people’s relationship with sad music: necessary and potentially indulgent. But as it turns out, listening to sad music isn’t just an excuse to partake in a pity party — it’s scientifically proven to be healthy.”

There’s a scientific reason we listen to sad music  (via micdotcom)

"…more empathetic people typically enjoy sad music. Sad music may offer us a safe proxy to work through our own feelings — and offer us comfort that we aren’t alone."

(via nearlya)

(via nearlya)


“High-intensity noise that exceeds 95 decibels disrupts performance on complex tasks but improves it on simple, boring tasks — noise tends to raise arousal level, which can be useful when trying to stay alert during mindless and monotonous work, but can agitate you out of creative flow when immersed in the kind of work that requires deliberate, reflective thought… These effects, of course, are relative to one’s psychological constitution… Writers more afflicted with anxiety tend to be more disconcerted by noisy environments. Proust and Carlyle appear to have been among those writers — the former wrote in a cork-lined room to eliminate obtrusive sounds and the latter in a noiseproof chamber to ensure absolute silence — whereas Allen Ginsberg was known for being able to write anywhere, from trains to planes to parks.” The psychology of how daily routine and work environment affect writing and creative flow (via explore-blog)

archisketchbook:

#architecture #section #dream #pavilion #red #skin #of #dream #concrete #nature #collage 
Zaur HuseynZada

archisketchbook:

#architecture #section #dream #pavilion #red #skin #of #dream #concrete #nature #collage 

Zaur HuseynZada


theparisreview:

Where is Vladimir Nabokov now? The third in a week-long series of illustrations by Jason Novak, captioned by Eric Jarosinski.

theparisreview:

Where is Vladimir Nabokov now? The third in a week-long series of illustrations by Jason Novak, captioned by Eric Jarosinski.


the-drawing-center:

Check out the amazing artwork in The Drawing Center’s Eleventh Annual Fall Benefit Auction, now live on Paddle8.
The auction will culminate on Wednesday, September 10th with a festive evening in our beautiful Soho gallery. Please purchase tickets here and join us for creative cocktails, delicious hors d’oeuvres, and bidding during the final hours of this exciting auction.


Image: Dasha Shishkin, Cat from Japan, 2012, Mixed media on mylar30 x 42 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetier Los Angeles Projects.

the-drawing-center:

Check out the amazing artwork in The Drawing Center’s Eleventh Annual Fall Benefit Auction, now live on Paddle8.

The auction will culminate on Wednesday, September 10th with a festive evening in our beautiful Soho gallery. Please purchase tickets here and join us for creative cocktails, delicious hors d’oeuvres, and bidding during the final hours of this exciting auction.

Image: Dasha Shishkin, Cat from Japan, 2012, Mixed media on mylar
30 x 42 inches, Courtesy of the artist and Susanne Vielmetier Los Angeles Projects.


Aug 26

(via mesineto)


(via mesineto)


mesineto:

FREE Worldwide Shipping Today!
Here ;)

mesineto:

FREE Worldwide Shipping Today!

Here ;)


“I prefer silence to sound, and the image produced by words occurs in silence.” William Faulkner (via theparisreview)

1956- Gordon Parks documented the everyday lives of an extended black family living in rural Alabama under Jim Crow segregation for Life magazine’s photo-essay “The Restraints: Open and Hidden.” (via)

(via oliviawaite)


likeafieldmouse:

Rooms with a View 

This exhibition focuses on a subject treasured by the Romantics: the view through an open window. German, French, Danish, and Russian artists first took up the theme in the second decade of the nineteenth century.

Juxtaposing near and far, the window is a metaphor for unfulfilled longing. Painters distilled this feeling in pictures of hushed, spare rooms with contemplative figures; studios with artists at work; and open windows as the sole motif. As the exhibition reveals, these pictures may shift markedly in tone, yet they share a distinct absence of the anecdote and narrative that characterized earlier genre painting.”

1. Peter Ilsted

2. Carl Holsøe

3. Léon Cogniet

4. Wilhelm Bendz

5. Alfred Broge

6. Caspar David Friedrich

7. Georg Friedrich Kersting

8. Jacobus Vrel

9. Johann Erdmann Hummel

10. Vilhelm Hammershøi


“Many people accept the idea that each of us has a certain resolute innerness—a kernel of selfhood that we can’t share with others. (Levin, at the end of “Anna Karenina,” calls it his “holy of holies,” and says that, no matter how close he grows to the people around him, there will always be “the same wall between my soul’s holy of holies and other people, even my wife.”) What interested Woolf was the way that we become aware of that innerness. We come to know it best, she thought, when we’re forced, at moments of exposure, to shield it against the outside world.

There can be something enjoyable, even revelatory about that feeling of self-protection, which is why we seek out circumstances in which we can feel more acutely the contrast between the outside world and our inner selves. Woolf was fascinated by city life—by the feeling of solitude-on-display that the sidewalk encourages, and by the way that “street haunting,” as she called it, allows you to lose and then find yourself in the rhythm of urban novelty and familiarity. She was drawn to the figure of the hostess: the woman-to-be-looked-at, standing at the top of the stairs, friendly to everyone, who grows only more mysterious with her visibility. (One of the pleasures of throwing a party, Woolf showed, is that it allows you to surprise yourself: surrounded by your friends, the center of attention, you feel your separateness from the social world you have convened.) She showed how parents, friends, lovers, and spouses can become more unknowable over time, not less—there is a core to their personhood that never gives itself up. Even as they put their lives on display, she thought, artists thrive when they maintain a final redoubt of privacy—a wellspring that remains unpolluted by the world outside. “A thing there was that mattered; a thing, wreathed about with chatter, defaced, obscured in her own life, let drop every day in corruption, lies, chatter,” Clarissa thinks, at the end of “Mrs. Dalloway.” Of course, it’s the chatter—the party—that helps her know that she has something to lose in the first place.”
Joshua Rothman, Virginia Woolf’s Idea of Privacy (via dashconballpit)

(via sb-wilde)



artistandstudio:

Robert Rauschenberg, 1971. Photo by Hans Namuth. “With his move in 1970 from New York to Captiva, an island off the Gulf Coast of Florida, Rauschenberg cleared his palette. Retreating from urban imagery, he now favored an abstract idiom and the use of natural fibers, such as fabric and paper.”

artistandstudio:

Robert Rauschenberg, 1971. Photo by Hans Namuth. “With his move in 1970 from New York to Captiva, an island off the Gulf Coast of Florida, Rauschenberg cleared his palette. Retreating from urban imagery, he now favored an abstract idiom and the use of natural fibers, such as fabric and paper.”

(via ttwhang)


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