The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Aug 1
likeafieldmouse:

Hear John Ashbery read more from The New Spirit & other of his poems here. 

likeafieldmouse:

Hear John Ashbery read more from The New Spirit & other of his poems here


free-parking:

Paintings by Vilhelm Hammershøi (1864-1916)


novocainelipstick:

gameraboy:

"I seek the crocodile"  Peter Pan (1924)

(via marvelousreality)



(via oliviawaite)


Jul 31

free-parking:

Robert SmithsonSpiral JettyRozel Point, Great Salt Lake, Utah. April 1970, mud, precipitated salt crystals, rocks, water coil 1500’ long and 15’ wide


archatlas:

Alfabeto Pittorico Antonio Basoli

(via stunninglyy)


architectural-review:

Lorenzo Degli Esposti, Consolation0011: Duplicating (and Rampant) Altanella on the “Casa dello studente a Chieti” by Giorgio Grassi (1935) and Antonio Monestiroli (1940), Milan, 2014

architectural-review:

Lorenzo Degli Esposti, Consolation0011: Duplicating (and Rampant) Altanella on the “Casa dello studente a Chieti” by Giorgio Grassi (1935) and Antonio Monestiroli (1940), Milan, 2014


7knotwind:

last Friday we had a day at DIA:Beacon-
It was akin to a pilgrimage for me, seeing works that truly transcend words and engage the viewer in a way that an image could never capture. (These photos are not mine—cameras are not allowed- as not to interrupt the almost spiritual aspect of experiencing these works)

for me the highlight was the company of fellow artists, friends and peers, our host and an unnamed special guest.
But being allowed behind the glass to experience the Heizer up close was amazing.

Images of work by: Heizer, Serra and Richter

(via nearlya)


amnhnyc:

Tomorrow night the Museum is hosting its first ever grown-up sleepover. The event sold out in less than a day, but you can still join in the fun! Just follow us on Instagram or Twitter @amnh for live updates, and see what a real night at the museum looks like: http://instagram.com/amnh

amnhnyc:

Tomorrow night the Museum is hosting its first ever grown-up sleepover. The event sold out in less than a day, but you can still join in the fun! Just follow us on Instagram or Twitter @amnh for live updates, and see what a real night at the museum looks like: http://instagram.com/amnh


theparisreview:

What common sounds from a hundred years ago are very rare or just plain don’t exist anymore? Sadie Stein on the Museum of Endangered Sounds.

theparisreview:

What common sounds from a hundred years ago are very rare or just plain don’t exist anymore? Sadie Stein on the Museum of Endangered Sounds.


archatlas:

Summer Over the City George Steinmetz


good:

In 2001, New York City had over 1,000 outdated subway cars on its hands. When they were first introduced in 1959, the old Redbird trains were gorgeous machines, but after four decades of service, it was time for the battered cars to be permanently retired. But rather than take them to a slag heap to be salvaged for scrap or crushed into little metal cubes, the city took 619 of the cars, stripped them of their windows and oily undercarriages, steam cleaned them, and then hauled the 20,000 pound metal boxes down to Delaware on a freighter ship. Then they dumped them all into the sea.

good:

In 2001, New York City had over 1,000 outdated subway cars on its hands. When they were first introduced in 1959, the old Redbird trains were gorgeous machines, but after four decades of service, it was time for the battered cars to be permanently retired. But rather than take them to a slag heap to be salvaged for scrap or crushed into little metal cubes, the city took 619 of the cars, stripped them of their windows and oily undercarriages, steam cleaned them, and then hauled the 20,000 pound metal boxes down to Delaware on a freighter ship. Then they dumped them all into the sea.


larrymarotta:


Rudolf Steiner—Chalkboard drawing, 29.xii.22

larrymarotta:

Rudolf Steiner—Chalkboard drawing, 29.xii.22

(via pinkfrequency)


centralparknyc:


Electric light poles for the transverse roads in Central Park, Manhattan, Department of Water Supply, Gas & Electricity, series 562, exhibit N, disapproved July 11, 1911. via nycdesignarchive

Did you know that the four transverse roads—east-west sunken roadways that carry traffic across the Park without disrupting park-goers—were featured only in the Greensward plan? The Greensward plan, the masterpiece of Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, was the only design submission that sunk these vital roads below grade. All the others had the roads at the same level as the Park, creating five small, separated sections. 

(Here are the light poles in use on the 86th Street Transverse in 1936. This shows the transverse after the removal of the trolley tracks. Photo from nycrecords here.)
Calvert and Vaux referred to the transverse roads at “sub-ways,” possibly the first use of the term in connection to New York City and transportation. The sunken roadways, and the bridges that carry people and vehicles above them, became the inspiration for the over- and underpasses of the modern highway system. 
History of the transverse roads comes from the wonderful little book, Seeing Central Park, by Central Park Conservancy’s official photographer and historian, Sara Cedar Miller.

centralparknyc:

Electric light poles for the transverse roads in Central Park, Manhattan, Department of Water Supply, Gas & Electricity, series 562, exhibit N, disapproved July 11, 1911. via nycdesignarchive

Did you know that the four transverse roads—east-west sunken roadways that carry traffic across the Park without disrupting park-goers—were featured only in the Greensward plan? The Greensward plan, the masterpiece of Frederick Law Olmstead and Calvert Vaux, was the only design submission that sunk these vital roads below grade. All the others had the roads at the same level as the Park, creating five small, separated sections. 

86th Street Transverse after Trolley Track Removal - From the NYC Department of Records

(Here are the light poles in use on the 86th Street Transverse in 1936. This shows the transverse after the removal of the trolley tracks. Photo from nycrecords here.)

Calvert and Vaux referred to the transverse roads at “sub-ways,” possibly the first use of the term in connection to New York City and transportation. The sunken roadways, and the bridges that carry people and vehicles above them, became the inspiration for the over- and underpasses of the modern highway system. 

History of the transverse roads comes from the wonderful little book, Seeing Central Park, by Central Park Conservancy’s official photographer and historian, Sara Cedar Miller.


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