The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, scientist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Apr 7

5582db:

Ronit Baranga - Spine, 2013

(via stunninglyy)


vasilyt:

Zhu Daoping

(via drawpaintprint)


designcube:

ONYX Sofa by Pierre Gimbergues for Peugeot Design Lab

(via stunninglyy)


nevver:

Kiyochika: Master of the Night

(via slloth)


jumblepusher:

Harry Callahan. “Eleanor, Aix-en-Provence”. 1958.

jumblepusher:

Harry Callahan. “Eleanor, Aix-en-Provence”. 1958.

(via sb-wilde)


poisonedreams:

Harry Clarke. Illustrations for Edgar Allan Poe’s Tales of Mystery and Imagination. 1919.

(via slloth)


livelymorgue:

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

(via npr)


satanasa:

Egor Shapovalov

satanasa:

Egor Shapovalov

(via electrical-potential)


Apr 6

Mirror of the Earth

Salar de Uyuni in Southwest Bolivia, the largest salt flatland in the world at 4,086 square miles, is so extremely flatty that space-faring satellites use it for atmosphere calibrations. As detailed in these pictures, Salar experiences an annual flooding producing a thin sheet of highly reflective water that seems to mirror the sky. I want to go to there.

Photos by Takaki Watanabe (via: Gizmodo)

(via electrical-potential)


nearlya:

Frances Richardson. pencil on paper


policymic:

Engineering company Festo is creating robots based on nature

German engineering firm Festo is creating a robot army. Sounds scary, right? But there’s no need to fear a “Skynet”-type apocalypse quite yet, because these robots want to do good by making laborious tasks easier in the factories of the future. And they’re using nature as their inspiration.

Festo summarizes the motivation behind their research on their website: “Gripping, moving, controlling and measuring – nature performs all of these tasks instinctively, easily and efficiently. What could be more logical than to examine these natural phenomena and learn from them?”

Read moreFollow policymic

(via dywiann-xyara)


whitneymuseum:

For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.

whitneymuseum:

For over four decades, Channa Horwitz produced works using a rigid formal vocabulary of her devising, built on a standardized grid and a system of notations based on the numbers 1 through 8, each assigned its own color. Horwitz developed the system as a way of marking and expressing time, movement, and rhythm.


“Art is in love with time. It needs time, it takes time, and it steals time in order to survive in time and be quiet enough to display the silence that betrays everybody and everything.” Marlene Dumas (via wordsnquotes)

(via ttwhang)


explore-blog:

A rare and wonderful interview with legendary, reclusive artist Agnes Martin 

explore-blog:

A rare and wonderful interview with legendary, reclusive artist Agnes Martin 


create-tivity:

Assembled from hundreds of cutout plants and animals from repurposed textbooks, artist Andrea Mastrovito created a striking installation where a colony of bats clings to the ceiling, a flight butterflies swarm the gallery walls, and all matter of insects, mamammals and plants intermingle across the floor.

You can see much more of Mastrovito’s work over on his website.