The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Jul 24

ckck:

Seems like IKEA are really shaking things up this year. In addition to the previously announced TV set, they’re also going to release a digital camera made of cardboard called Knäppa (“Snap”). It’ll hold 40 photographs at a time and plugs directly into your USB port. While it’s not the prettiest camera the world has ever seen, I do love the idea of a screen-less digital camera that brings people back to the wait-and-see days of film.

(via electrical-potential)


“The world is not a solid continent of facts sprinkled by a few lakes of uncertainties, but a vast ocean of uncertainties speckled by a few islands of calibrated and stabilized forms.” Bruno Latour (via inthenoosphere)

(via nearlya)


explore-blog:

The Poetics of Reverie – philosopher Gaston Bachelard on dreams, love, solitude, and happiness, a beautiful read.

explore-blog:

The Poetics of Reverie – philosopher Gaston Bachelard on dreams, love, solitude, and happiness, a beautiful read.


explore-blog:

Mr. Rogers shows you how crayons are made.

(via The Kid Should See This)


Jul 23

mayahan:

Stitched Leaves by Hillary Fayle

(via stunninglyy)


“be softer with you. you are a breathing thing. a memory to someone. a home to a life.” nayyirah waheed (via pussyri0t)

(via pussyri0t)


omgfabulous:

rollership:

asylum-art: Soundsuits’ of Artist & Fashion Designer Nick Cave

"Nick Cave (born 1959 in central Missouri, USA) is an American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist. He is best known for his Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and other-worldly."
“Cave’s first Soundsuit was made of twigs. Other typical materials include dyed human hair, sisal, plastic buttons, beads, sequins, and feathers. His work is a crazy mix of media—these bunny suits are made of human hair, and others are montages of vintage finds, beads, buttons and old style needle crafts like crocheting and macrame. The finished pieces bear some resemblance to African ceremonial costumes and masks. His suits are presented for public viewing as static sculptures, but also through live performance, video, and photograph

…this, though awesome in their own right, has left me very confused about what the bad seeds have been up to lately

(via stunninglyy)


“Today we often forget that prior to World War II, every city in America was built for easy walking and biking. In fact, the idea of living in a walkable place is nothing radical. What was radical was the program we undertook to build an entirely new type of human life. We built networks of roadways and freeways like nothing any society had ever seen before. We tore down entire neighborhoods to accommodate these roads as well as the parking lots and garages required by the cars that would travel these roads; at the same time, we ripped out the tracks for streetcars and trains.” Kevin Klinkenberg on the journey we’ve taken to create unwalkable cities.  (via thisbigcity)

“Saturdays are for adventure; Sundays are for cuddling” General life philosophy (via)

(via tocolorthehours)


Jul 22

ryanpanos:

House at Camusdarach Sands | Raw Architecture Workshop | Via

(via stunninglyy)




Jul 21

mymodernmet:

Studio Allergutendinge designed the Soul Box, a mobile wooden shelter that can be transported anywhere. The minimalist, two-story building features a kitchen and bed on the lower floor, with a viewing platform on the upper one.

(via stunninglyy)


newyorker:


MINNEAPOLIS (The Borowitz Report)—Historians studying archival photographs from four decades ago have come to the conclusion that the U.S. must have believed in science at some point.

Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kLL9l1

newyorker:

MINNEAPOLIS (The Borowitz Report)—Historians studying archival photographs from four decades ago have come to the conclusion that the U.S. must have believed in science at some point.

Continue reading: http://nyr.kr/1kLL9l1


archatlas:

Open Shutter Project Michael Wesely

  • Images 1-3: Museum of Modern Art in New York
  • Images 4-5: Potsdamer Platz in Berlin
  • Image 6: Leipziger Platz in Berlin
  • Image 7: Allianz Arena Football Stadium in Munich

"Since the early 1990s, German photographer Michael Wesely has been inventing and refining techniques for using extremely long camera exposures to take uniquely compelling photographs. Through the use of filters and a very small aperture, yet one that is standard in a professional camera lens, he is able to diminish the amount of light hitting the negative to the point where he can extend the exposure many thousands of times longer than we would ordinarily expect." [via]

(via destructionisnotnegative)