The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Aug 19

likeafieldmouse:

Dimitri Kozyrev - The Last One (2009-14)




“Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.”
Armed police: Trigger happy | The Economist (via kenyatta)

(via fishingboatproceeds)



Out comes the whip. We’re lazy, stuck, worthless. Our ideas are shallow, uninteresting, tepid. What’s our problem? Why can’t we just crank out pages like some literary version of a well-oiled machine?

I’ll tell you why not. Because this writing thing is hard. It always feels good to have written, but it rarely feels good to sit down to write. If I were to describe my own physical process, it’s like a nearly-unbearable tension within me slowly begins to rise. A welling up of so many thoughts and feelings that it feels I might explode. And yet, at the same time, there is the seeming impossibility of finding the words, of knowing what’s next, of getting it right. Shoulders tense. Jaw tightens. Eyes sting. Breath becomes shallow. Mind buzzes in circles endlessly. The page is a solid wall at which I must run, full tilt, and only by running, only by hurling myself straight at it might it crumble and give way. But it appears so solid! So unforgiving! Sometime I bang against it, and limp away, bruised and bloody. Other times, it turns out the wall was just a mirage. But there’s only one way to find out.

[…]

So. How to begin? Improbably enough, we must begin with kindness.

The brilliant Dani Shapiro, a modern sage of the pleasures and perils of writing and the creative life, reflects on getting to work.

Complement with Shapiro on why creativity requires leaping into the unknown and her spectacular conversation with Debbie Millman.

(via explore-blog)


pages from Virginia Woolf’s notebook. (source)

pages from Virginia Woolf’s notebook. (source)

(via paradoxicalsentiments)


jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!

Where does the smell of rain come from?

If you said “from the sky,” then congratulations! You are hilarious. But it’s a lot more interesting than that. The pungent perfume that accompanies rainstorms carries special chemical signatures, some born from lightning, some from deep within the soil.

And beyond just being pleasant and nostalgic, those smells are actually useful to some living things, such as telling plants when it’s time to grow, guiding camels across the desert, and even signaling some fish when it’s time to get “romantic”. 

Take a big whiff, because there’s a science storm a-comin’!



Aug 18
chadwys:

Hardback collection of prints by Jacques Villon (French, 1875-1963).  Les Bucoliques de Virgile, Scripta & Picta, edited by Paul Valéry and published in Paris, 1953 (Ginestet & Pouillon).

chadwys:

Hardback collection of prints by Jacques Villon (French, 1875-1963).  Les Bucoliques de Virgile, Scripta & Pictaedited by Paul Valéry and published in Paris, 1953 (Ginestet & Pouillon).

(via stunninglyy)


did-you-kno:

In San Francisco, an old public bus has been transformed into a portable shower station for the homeless.
Source

did-you-kno:

In San Francisco, an old public bus has been transformed into a portable shower station for the homeless.

Source

(via thisbigcity)


likeafieldmouse:

Wyatt Kahn - Contender (2009)

likeafieldmouse:

Wyatt Kahn - Contender (2009)

(via stunninglyy)


hipinuff:

El Lissitzky (Russian: 1890-1941), Sketch for Proun 6B, c.1919-21. Pencil and gouache on paper.

hipinuff:

El Lissitzky (Russian: 1890-1941), Sketch for Proun 6B, c.1919-21. Pencil and gouache on paper.

(via jaimemixtapes)


“As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London.”

London and Its Dead

i read shit like this and think what could my imagination possibly have to add

like how do i write something about london that’s weirder than london already is?

(via weunderstandthelights)

(via furrybaby)