The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Sep 15

archatlas:

Coffee Drip Brew Machines  Dutch Lab

"Dutch Lab, our main business, with the professional barista Jaewoong Kwak working together with global designers, is MZDB’s coffee brand. In Dutch Lab, you can see the works of the best designers from countries around the world. As in-house designers, we have architectural, industrial, graphical designers from Hong-Ik University who are engaged in various design activities. We have participated in various numbers of design exhibitions such as The Stockholm Furniture Fair 2009, Maison & Objet 2013 in Paris to enhance the value of Dutch Lab‘s unique design.”



camillataylor:

A figure from “They’ve already left” installed in its new home.
Fabric, screenprint, buttons, ephemera, and welded steel infrastructure by Camilla Taylor.

camillataylor:

A figure from “They’ve already left” installed in its new home.

Fabric, screenprint, buttons, ephemera, and welded steel infrastructure by Camilla Taylor.



publicartfund:

In recognition of International Literacy Day here is Amy Hauft’s 1992 installation Whitman Raised, in which she posted Whitman’s 1855 ode to Brooklyn, “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” in the trees of Cadman Plaza Park, steps from where Whitman first published Leaves of Grass.

Celebrate literacy by reading “Crossing Brooklyn Ferry” in its entirety!

Photo credit: John Maggiotto

(via jaimemixtapes)


humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."
(Dharamshala, India)

humansofnewyork:

"I think the great fear of every Tibetan is that our story will die out. It’s been over fifty years now since Tibet lost its independence. Our monasteries have been destroyed. The Chinese language curriculum is being mandated in our schools. More and more Han Chinese are moving into Tibet— building homes, building malls. I think now we are all starting to think that the Chinese are too powerful and that the dream of returning home is fading away. I think our mistake was that we didn’t keep up with the world. We held on to the monastic tradition too tightly. We didn’t embrace modern education, and so we weren’t connected with the outside world. Because of that, we lost our freedom silently. I think our challenge now is to educate our children in a modern way, so hopefully they will be better at sharing our story."

(Dharamshala, India)


raise ur hand if you’re ready to ditch your body and become a sentient cloud of cosmic gas

(via slloth)


architecture-apprentice:

Really struggling to work out what in the world this book is talking about. I know it is a key book for my Venice research write up (perception of 2d digital space vs 3d physical space), but the whole thing is so dense and abstract in it’s explanation that it feels like it is wrote in another language. 

architecture-apprentice:

Really struggling to work out what in the world this book is talking about. I know it is a key book for my Venice research write up (perception of 2d digital space vs 3d physical space), but the whole thing is so dense and abstract in it’s explanation that it feels like it is wrote in another language. 


Sep 14

maxkirin:

To my dear artistic, writerly, and wonderful followers,

Watch this video. Save it in your favorites. Keep it where you can always watch it, where you know you can find it.

This is Neil Gaiman’s famous ‘Make Good Art’ speech, the source of countless comics and infographics. It’s inspirational, funny, and straight from the heart.

Watch it, and keep it around.

It will save your art.

(via traderoute-skin)


fuckyeahcartography:

Road Map Series by Matthew Magruder.

fuckyeahcartography:

Road Map Series by Matthew Magruder.


Sep 13
free-parking:

Bill Viola — Heaven and Earth, video installation, 1992

The exposed tubes of two black and white video monitors are positioned facing each other, separated by a few inches and mounted at the ends of two wood columns that extend from the floor and ceiling respectively. The upper monitor shows video footage of the artist’s mother on her deathbed and the lower monitor shows the face of his newborn son only days old. Since the glass surface of each monitor reflects the image on the opposing screen, the birth-face and the death-face appear simultaneously as layered reflections within each other’s image. (via)

free-parking:

Bill Viola — Heaven and Earth, video installation, 1992

The exposed tubes of two black and white video monitors are positioned facing each other, separated by a few inches and mounted at the ends of two wood columns that extend from the floor and ceiling respectively. The upper monitor shows video footage of the artist’s mother on her deathbed and the lower monitor shows the face of his newborn son only days old. Since the glass surface of each monitor reflects the image on the opposing screen, the birth-face and the death-face appear simultaneously as layered reflections within each other’s image. (via)

(via stunninglyy)


thegoldeneternity:

Luigi Ghirri, Atelier Morandi, Grizzana, 1989-90

thegoldeneternity:

Luigi Ghirri, Atelier Morandi, Grizzana, 1989-90

(via paradoxicalsentiments)


“I am hands

and face

and feet

and things inside of me 
that I can’t see.”
Laura Riding, “Forgotten Girlhood” (via larmoyante)

(via traderoute-skin)


“Maps are not copies, they are projections… When drawing up a map, a cartographer must choose between zenithal, gnomonic, stereographic, orthographic, globular, conical, cylindrical, or sinusoidal modes of projections. Each of these brings with it as many disadvantages as benefits. Projections are not neutral, natural, or ‘given’: they are constructed, configured, underpinned by various—and quite arbitrary—conventions… And yet, explicitly or not, all maps carry with them a certain claim; that this one is somehow truer than the others with which it competes.”

Tom McCarthy, Mapping It Out: An Alternative Atlas of Contemporary Cartographies

(via tiggerbounced)

(via fuckyeahcartography)