The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, urbanist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Posts tagged Books

Jul 5

Truly the best anti-theft sign I have ever seen. It reads: 

"In response to those recently leaving with books without paying for them, otherwise known as "stealing", please be advised that you are not a 1970s Roberto Bolano, nor are you a charming street urchin of Victorian England posed with the existential problem of stealing bread in order to prolong your troubled existence. You are not “sticking it to the MAN”, or padding your imagined future autobiography, or behind the music documentary through your actions (and, in the future will you have wanted theft from a bookstore in 21st century Chelsea to be part of your past?)

Remember that we are an Independent Bookstore and as often as possible, we stock books from presses that publish the works of authors who go otherwise unnoticed by larger publishers. 

Can You Not See That We Are Your FRIEND? 

In all other respects, we are all part of an already faltering industry that will cease to exist unless you vote with your wallets against the alternative (which provides you with no tangible artifact of sentimental virtue to walk off into the rest of your life with—whether paying for it or not.)

No one in the above described process receives lottery-like bales of monetary compensation for their painstaking efforts to write, make, and distribute works that, were you to have read them closely enough, should have by now inculcated in you through a genuine understanding of their ultimate content and the primary urge that drives their creation, a Moral Education which brings one to a closer understanding of our universal experiences, the binds of our common humanity. 

In sum, we are not the 1%. If you are in it for yourself, perhaps you are on the wrong career path or cultivate the wrong entertainments. Books are the conduit of a symbiosis between reader and writer, and publishers and bookstores are the ecosystems that bring them together. If you don’t love an author’s work enough to buy their books, don’t, but please reward your favorite authors by buying their creations. 

Support them as much as possible so they can continue making what you love.”

-From the staff at Posman Books (Chelsea Market, NYC)


Aug 26

alecshao:

Chris Cobb - There is Nothing Wrong in this Whole World (2004), an installation of 20,000 books arranged to create a continuous spectrum

(via nerdhabits)


Aug 23

teachingliteracy:

zebra—crossings

I have this book, and it is as beautiful as it looks in these photographs. And the blue linen cover is so soft and lovely to hold. 

(via typographie)


Aug 20

typographie:

The Backlist Classics collection are a hardback series that use a unifying grid system. Both ‘The Coran’ and ‘The Iliad’ feature Richard Sarson’s hand-drawn black and white geometrical illustrations. ‘The Coran’s’ illustration picks up the book’s metaphysical and religious nature, while the circles on ‘The Iliad’ hint at the intricate, circular nature of the story. An illustration of the Penrose triangle was used for the utopian nature of ‘Utopia’. The aim was to produce elegant, attractive books that evoke the rich heritage of classic literature, while retaining a fresh appeal to modern readers, that both stand out in bookshops and have a longevity appropriate to their contents.

(You want to view these as large as possible!)


Aug 19

“For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet or excite you. Books help us understand who we are and how we are to behave. They show us what community and friendship mean; they show us how to live and die.” Anne Lamott (via amandaonwriting)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


(via typographie)


“Buying a book is not about obtaining a possession, but about securing a portal.” Laura Miller (via booksandnerds)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


Jul 9
poetsorg:

Signed by Allen Ginsberg

poetsorg:

Signed by Allen Ginsberg


Jul 5
“A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man’s mind can get both provocation and privacy.” Edward P. Morgan (via somethingbookish)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)



Jul 2
warbyparker:

How Good Books Can Change You
Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.
They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.
Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr] (via theatlantic)

warbyparker:

How Good Books Can Change You

Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.

They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.

Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr] (via theatlantic)

(via warbyparker)


“I have never watched anything before and it made me feel very curious. Scientific people are always curious, and I am going to be scientific. I keep saying to myself, ‘What is it? What is it?’ It’s something. it can’t be nothing! I don’t know its name so I call it Magic. I have never seen the sun rise but Mary and Dickon have and from what they tell me i’m sure that is magic too. Something pushes it up and draws it. Sometimes since I’ve been in the garden, I’ve looked up through the trees at the sky and I have a strange feeling of being happy as if something were pushing and drawing in my chest and making me breathe fast. Magic is always pushing and drawing and making things out of nothing. Everything is made out of Magic, leaves and trees, flowers and birds, badgers and foxes and squirrels and people. So it must be all around us… I don’t know how to do it but I think that if you keep thinking about it and calling it, perhaps it will come.” Colin Craven, The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (via apotofprintedwords)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


decaturjim:

Visual comparison of the six editions of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species
Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species was undoubtedly a seminal work that continues to inform modern science.
The completion of the final, however, was a long drawn-out process that Darwin continued to revise over the course of 15 years, resulting in a total of six editions. The changes Darwin made to the text included:
A response to religious objections;
Various revised and re-written sentences;
The addition of a new chapter to address opposing arguments.
To illustrate each edition of the book, a visual comparison has been generated (above) that uses phylogenetic trees to differentiate between and highlight all changes made in each subsequent edition:
Using data from online versions of the books, the designers created six wheels, each representing a different edition, with each chapter divided into sub-chapters, paragraphs (represented by a leaf shape), and sentences (represented by a smaller ‘leaflet’). The sentences are colored blue or orange based on whether or not they will appear in the next edition—on whether or not they will survive. Changes representing scientific advances, adjustments in the author’s thought process, and conflicting sections in the text become apparent, with subtleties as well as major changes immediately revealed.
This figure is included in the book Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects.

decaturjim:

Visual comparison of the six editions of Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species

Charles Darwin’s On the Origin of Species was undoubtedly a seminal work that continues to inform modern science.

The completion of the final, however, was a long drawn-out process that Darwin continued to revise over the course of 15 years, resulting in a total of six editions. The changes Darwin made to the text included:

  • A response to religious objections;
  • Various revised and re-written sentences;
  • The addition of a new chapter to address opposing arguments.

To illustrate each edition of the book, a visual comparison has been generated (above) that uses phylogenetic trees to differentiate between and highlight all changes made in each subsequent edition:

Using data from online versions of the books, the designers created six wheels, each representing a different edition, with each chapter divided into sub-chapters, paragraphs (represented by a leaf shape), and sentences (represented by a smaller ‘leaflet’). The sentences are colored blue or orange based on whether or not they will appear in the next edition—on whether or not they will survive. Changes representing scientific advances, adjustments in the author’s thought process, and conflicting sections in the text become apparent, with subtleties as well as major changes immediately revealed.

This figure is included in the book Talk to Me: Design and the Communication between People and Objects.


Jun 27

explore-blog:

The editors, designers, and creative directors at Random House offer a behind-the-scenes look at what it takes to publish a book.


Page 1 of 4