The Art of Wonder

A Brown University/Rhode Island School of Design Dual-Degree student (BRDD, 2017), artist, writer, scientist, and explorer of the world dedicated to finding Wondrous things. Art, design, science, literature and the connections between them. For my original artwork see http://arianamakesart.tumblr.com/

Posts tagged reading

Aug 4
“It’s not humankind after all
nor is it culture
that limits us.
It is the vastness
we do not enter.
It is the stars
we do not let own us.”
Culture and the Universe, Simon J. Ortiz 

“In spite of the overwhelming reliability of things,
the wind making rivulets on my sleeve same as window glass,
the same rocks shaped by the same reasons on Mars,
I am like a cricket singing to another sore voice. I hear it,
but faithful to symmetry, I don’t move closer.
It may not be singing to me. Movement may lead to dissolution.
Stars could make up new animals. The dragonfly
might chase the swallow as it did today in warning.
I am living at the edge of light looking out
over water that touches Mexico. The edge of the continent
holds hands with inlets and I mention them over and over
as if no one listened the last time. The common insists.
Lynx and orchids for some. Underwinter life below the ice.
From here I wave to you like polishing the air.”
“The Common Insists”, from Fragile Acts by Allan Peterson 


Jul 5

Truly the best anti-theft sign I have ever seen. It reads: 

"In response to those recently leaving with books without paying for them, otherwise known as "stealing", please be advised that you are not a 1970s Roberto Bolano, nor are you a charming street urchin of Victorian England posed with the existential problem of stealing bread in order to prolong your troubled existence. You are not “sticking it to the MAN”, or padding your imagined future autobiography, or behind the music documentary through your actions (and, in the future will you have wanted theft from a bookstore in 21st century Chelsea to be part of your past?)

Remember that we are an Independent Bookstore and as often as possible, we stock books from presses that publish the works of authors who go otherwise unnoticed by larger publishers. 

Can You Not See That We Are Your FRIEND? 

In all other respects, we are all part of an already faltering industry that will cease to exist unless you vote with your wallets against the alternative (which provides you with no tangible artifact of sentimental virtue to walk off into the rest of your life with—whether paying for it or not.)

No one in the above described process receives lottery-like bales of monetary compensation for their painstaking efforts to write, make, and distribute works that, were you to have read them closely enough, should have by now inculcated in you through a genuine understanding of their ultimate content and the primary urge that drives their creation, a Moral Education which brings one to a closer understanding of our universal experiences, the binds of our common humanity. 

In sum, we are not the 1%. If you are in it for yourself, perhaps you are on the wrong career path or cultivate the wrong entertainments. Books are the conduit of a symbiosis between reader and writer, and publishers and bookstores are the ecosystems that bring them together. If you don’t love an author’s work enough to buy their books, don’t, but please reward your favorite authors by buying their creations. 

Support them as much as possible so they can continue making what you love.”

-From the staff at Posman Books (Chelsea Market, NYC)


Jun 18
“it is wrong to chide the novel for being fascinated by mysterious coincidences… but it is right to chide man for being blind to such coincidences in his daily life. For he thereby deprives his life a dimension of beauty.”  Milan Kundera, The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Aug 19
“For some of us, books are as important as almost anything else on earth. What a miracle it is that out of these small, flat, rigid squares of paper unfolds world after world after world, worlds that sing to you, comfort and quiet or excite you. Books help us understand who we are and how we are to behave. They show us what community and friendship mean; they show us how to live and die.” Anne Lamott (via amandaonwriting)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


“Buying a book is not about obtaining a possession, but about securing a portal.” Laura Miller (via booksandnerds)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


Jul 5
“A book is the only place in which you can examine a fragile thought without breaking it, or explore an explosive idea without fear it will go off in your face. It is one of the few havens remaining where a man’s mind can get both provocation and privacy.” Edward P. Morgan (via somethingbookish)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)



Jul 2
warbyparker:

How Good Books Can Change You
Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.
They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.
Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr] (via theatlantic)

warbyparker:

How Good Books Can Change You

Summer’s here and time for summer reading at the beach, in a hammock or on the porch. Books are great for passing the time on lazy summer afternoons. And according to Ohio State researchers, the books you read from childhood on can also change who you are.

They do this by a process the researchers called experience taking. More than just understanding a character, it’s taking a little of them inside of you and changing yourself in the process. It’s not something that you plan on, it happens spontaneously. Good writing helps, but there’s much more involved.

Read more. [Image: Alexandre Dulaunoy/Flickr] (via theatlantic)

(via warbyparker)


“I have never watched anything before and it made me feel very curious. Scientific people are always curious, and I am going to be scientific. I keep saying to myself, ‘What is it? What is it?’ It’s something. it can’t be nothing! I don’t know its name so I call it Magic. I have never seen the sun rise but Mary and Dickon have and from what they tell me i’m sure that is magic too. Something pushes it up and draws it. Sometimes since I’ve been in the garden, I’ve looked up through the trees at the sky and I have a strange feeling of being happy as if something were pushing and drawing in my chest and making me breathe fast. Magic is always pushing and drawing and making things out of nothing. Everything is made out of Magic, leaves and trees, flowers and birds, badgers and foxes and squirrels and people. So it must be all around us… I don’t know how to do it but I think that if you keep thinking about it and calling it, perhaps it will come.” Colin Craven, The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (via apotofprintedwords)

(via a-good-book-has-no-ending)


Jun 28

Walt Whitman Appreciation

This summer, I have made it my goal to read both the original and “death-bed” editions of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass in their entirety and to study them deeply. I have done this with only one Whitman poem (arguably Whitman’s most famous), “Song of Myself”. This sublime treatise details the power of Nature, of People, of the American Spirt, of Work, of Suffering, of Joy, and of the Self. It is written in plain, honest language and can be read and understood on different levels by all people. “Song of Myself” transcends history, class, and culture, and speaks on a level more universal and primeval than all of these. Although I have casually read many of the other poems in Leaves of Grass, “Song of Myself” has been the only one I’ve delved into and from which I’ve gained true understanding. 

Last year, as part of a school assignment, I spent about two months with “Song of Myself”, taking it apart and putting it back together in the context of American history and Whitman’s personal narrative, and finally, in the context of my own life and understanding of the world. From that point on, Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself” became, for me, a kind of sacred text. I gained and continue to gain from “Song of Myself” what people of faith gain from the holy books of their faiths: guidance, comfort, resolve, solace, mystery, visions of the past, present, future. I subscribe to no faith and do not mean to say I have become a disciple of sorts of  Walt Whitman. I mean only to say that I know, from personal experience, that written words (even those which are not divinely inspired) have the power to transform and enrich one’s life. 

Now I wish to expand that transformative experience. In reading the rest of Walt Whitman’s poems the way I read “Song of Myself”, I hope to know more intimately the language Walt Whitman spoke. I wish to understand the conversations Walt Whitman had with the Universe in its own tongue. 


Jun 12

Maltilda: forever and always relevant. 

(via strangevoyage)


Jun 7
newyorker:

It’s that time of year again, when citizens of the publishing world from all over the country pack up their tote bags and slip into their clogs for the long trek to the westernmost reaches of Midtown to attend BookExpo America (B.E.A.). Sasha Weiss was there to collect all the latest and greatest news from the Book-world, and you can catch up here: http://nyr.kr/LySByA  Also, amongst BookExpo America’s own rock stars were two actual rock stars, Neil Young and Patti Smith, who appeared on Wednesday afternoon for an onstage conversation.  Ben Greenman has that story, here: http://nyr.kr/KHsVnp

newyorker:

It’s that time of year again, when citizens of the publishing world from all over the country pack up their tote bags and slip into their clogs for the long trek to the westernmost reaches of Midtown to attend BookExpo America (B.E.A.). Sasha Weiss was there to collect all the latest and greatest news from the Book-world, and you can catch up here: http://nyr.kr/LySByA  Also, amongst BookExpo America’s own rock stars were two actual rock stars, Neil Young and Patti Smith, who appeared on Wednesday afternoon for an onstage conversation.  Ben Greenman has that story, here: http://nyr.kr/KHsVnp


Page 1 of 3